Your are here:

Red banded mango caterpillar

Scientific Name
Deanolis sublimbalis
Scientific Author
Snellen
Taxonomy
(Lepidoptera: Crambidae: Odontinae)
Status
Exotic Species Occurrence in Australia
Reliability
High
Download
PDF

Page menu options:

Diagnostic Images

Close
Caption
Source
Image Options
Close
Diagnostic Images (19)
Other Images (16)
Diagnostic Notes
Eggs are laid on fruit surfaces and larvae bore through the skin to feed on the pulp and the seed. Fruit are attacked in various stages of development. Soon after the larvae enter the fruit, secondary infection by fruit fly, other pests and pathogens may occur, causing rotting and premature dropping of fruit. Larva create a hole in the side of the fruit from which sap drips and collects on the bottom of the fruit leaving a characteristic dark stain.

There are no published keys available to identify RBMC however; diagnosis is predominantly dependant on larval identification. If a brightly red and white banded caterpillar is found infesting mango fruit or on or near Mangifera spp. then it is likely to be RBMC.

Eggs laid singly, in twos, irregular shapes which conform to the crevices laid in; ovoid; milky white when laid turn crimson after 2-3 days.

Larvae 1st instar cream with black head and 11 pink bands dorsally; instars 2 and 3 larger with the coloured bands darkening to a bright red.

Pupae 14 days; in ground in woven silk cocoon or in the bark on tree trunks.

Adult approximately 12mm long with white scales on vertex, a whitish line on lateral margins of pronotum and a transverse white band dorsally on 3rd abdominal segment; forewings white mixed with dark scales, giving a pale brown appearance overall, a brown band of varying thickness present along the termen, apex and tornus and a faint incomplete dark brown median line; hindwings white with a narrow dark brown band along the apical half of the termen, broad light brown longitudinal band across middle to wings; females usually larger than males; female abdomens taper, male abdomens have a rounded apex (Kuroko & Lewvanich 1993).

To date, there are no published genitalia descriptions for RBMC. I provide dissected male and female photographs for identification purposes.

Coming soon - PBT link with DNA barcoding
More Information
Specimen Contact
DAFF Biosecurity Darwin
Author
Walker, K., S. Anderson & L. Tran-Nguyen
Created
27/05/2005 04:28 AEST
Last Updated
24/02/2012 19:22 AEST
Citation
Walker, K., S. Anderson & L. Tran-Nguyen (2005) Red banded mango caterpillar (Deanolis sublimbalis) Updated on 2/24/2012 7:22:31 PM Available online: PaDIL - http://www.padil.gov.au.
Image Use
Free for use under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia License

Loading