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Dry Rot of Citrus

Scientific Name
Nematospora coryli
Scientific Author
Peglion
Taxonomy
(Ascomycetes)
Status
Exotic Species Occurrence in Australia
Reliability
High
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Diagnostic Images

Hyphae and globose yeast cells
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Caption
Scale bar = 10 µm
Source
Dr Roger Shivas DPI&F
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Diagnostic Images (5)
Diagnostic Notes

Nematospora coryli produces cylindrical-obtuse asci, 57-68 x 6-9 µm, each containing 4–8 needle-shaped ascospores, 40-50 x 2 µm.

 

Ascospores are two celled with a long, slender, flexuous, whip-like appendage, 10-25µm long, arising from one end.  The two cells stain differentially in acid fuchsin in lacto-glycerol with only the appendaged cell staining.

 

Spores are arranged in two groups within the ascus with the non-appendaged ends oriented towards the poles of the ascus.  Mycelium is septate, with swollen fusiform to clavate cells and the more or less globose yeast cells, which are 18-22 µm diam. 

 

Growth in culture on PDA+S for 7 days results in colonies, which are white to cream, butryous, smooth, slightly raised, with a narrow mycelial fringe.

 

Nematospora coryli is described and illustrated in Barnett et al. (2000) and de Hoog et al. (2000).

 

The fungus is usually transmitted by sap-sucking pentatomid (Hemiptera) insects and the yeast always enters through insect punctures (Mukerji 1968).  The yeast survives in adults through the insect’s life (Kulik and Sinclair 1993).

More Information
Specimen Contact
Dr Roger Shivas
Author
Shivas RG
Created
16/12/2005 12:16 AEST
Last Updated
11/01/2007 22:40 AEST
Citation
Shivas RG (2005) Dry Rot of Citrus (Nematospora coryli) Updated on 1/11/2007 10:40:46 PM Available online: PaDIL - http://www.padil.gov.au.
Image Use
Free for use under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia License

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