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Sweet Orange Fruit Scab

Scientific Name
Elsinoë australis
Scientific Author
Bitanc. & Jenkins
Taxonomy
Ascomycetes
Status
Exotic species - absent from Australia
Reliability
High
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Diagnostic Notes

Symptoms

Elsinoë australis affects the fruit and leaves of host plants and rarely the stems. Fruit and leaf lesions are dark in colour, round, flattened and smooth. On younger fruits it causes a deformation of rind, forming corky, round/irregular, protuberant lesions 2–6 mm. Leaf and twig lesions are initially funnel-shaped pockets, later scab-like, smooth, glossy, amphigenous, up to 2 mm diam. (Sivanesan & Critchett 1974, Wilson 2007).

 

It can be distinguished from Elsinoë fawcettii which has lighter lesions that are irregular in shape, are raised and rough and infect fruit, leaves and stems.

 

 

The fungus:

Ascomata globose, sometimes flattened or irregular, occasionally confluent, 40–120 µm in diam., buff, embedded in the tissues of the perfect stage, erumpent, consisting of a hyaline or slightly yellowish pseudoparenchyma devoid of a well defined epithecium. Asci often distributed in the upper part of the ascoma, globose to obclavate, inner wall thickened apically, 15–27 × 13–21 µm. Ascospores hyaline, variable, straight or more or less curved, 2–4 celled, often markedly constricted not only at median septum, but also at the other two, sometimes with a longitudinal septum in the upper middle cell, which is frequently slightly larger than the other cells, 12–20 × 4–8 µm. Conidial stage, Sphaceloma australis (Bitancourt & Jenkins 1936).

More Information
Author
McTaggart, A.
Created
11/10/2007 10:16 AEST
Last Updated
21/12/2007 09:19 AEST
Citation
McTaggart, A. (2007) Sweet Orange Fruit Scab (Elsinoë australis) Updated on 12/21/2007 9:19:30 AM Available online: PaDIL - http://www.padil.gov.au.
Image Use
Free for use under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia License

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